obitoftheday
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Fraggle Rock's Human
Every episode of Fraggle Rock (1983-1987) began with a trip through the window of the slightly befuddled tinkerer, “Doc,” under whose work shed lived a world of Fraggles, Doozers, and Gorgs. Alongside his trusty Muppet dog Sprocket, Doc, played by Gerard Parkes, appeared in all 96 episodes of the Jim Henson production.
Mr. Parkes was born in Dublin and moved to Canada in the 1950s to make his mark in acting. Beginning in radio, eventually Mr. Parkes moved to the stage and screen - and had success in both venues. In 1968 he won the a Canadian Film Award as Best Actor for his work in the film Isabel. More than three decades later he won a Dora for his performance in the play Kilt. 
For much of his career he played small, but impactful, parts in a variety of television shows and films. He appeared in several episodes of Shining Time Station, and many know him for his other “Doc” role in 1999’s The Boondock Saints.
But he loved that his best-known role was on Fraggle Rock. His agent was quoted as saying, “He had a thrill doing that show….It was one of those roles that hit a chord with kids and adults.”
Gerard Parkes died on October 19, 2014 at the age of 90.
Sources: CBC, Toronto Star, IMDB.com
(Image of Gerard Parkes as “Doc” and Sprocket, played by Steve Whitmire who has played Kermit and Ernie since Jim Henson’s death, circa 1983 is courtesy of the Muppet Wiki)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Fraggle Rock's Human

Every episode of Fraggle Rock (1983-1987) began with a trip through the window of the slightly befuddled tinkerer, “Doc,” under whose work shed lived a world of Fraggles, Doozers, and Gorgs. Alongside his trusty Muppet dog Sprocket, Doc, played by Gerard Parkes, appeared in all 96 episodes of the Jim Henson production.

Mr. Parkes was born in Dublin and moved to Canada in the 1950s to make his mark in acting. Beginning in radio, eventually Mr. Parkes moved to the stage and screen - and had success in both venues. In 1968 he won the a Canadian Film Award as Best Actor for his work in the film Isabel. More than three decades later he won a Dora for his performance in the play Kilt

For much of his career he played small, but impactful, parts in a variety of television shows and films. He appeared in several episodes of Shining Time Station, and many know him for his other “Doc” role in 1999’s The Boondock Saints.

But he loved that his best-known role was on Fraggle Rock. His agent was quoted as saying, “He had a thrill doing that show….It was one of those roles that hit a chord with kids and adults.”

Gerard Parkes died on October 19, 2014 at the age of 90.

Sources: CBC, Toronto Star, IMDB.com

(Image of Gerard Parkes as “Doc” and Sprocket, played by Steve Whitmire who has played Kermit and Ernie since Jim Henson’s death, circa 1983 is courtesy of the Muppet Wiki)

pricklylegs

Zodiac Expressions of Happiness

  • ♈ Aries: Decreased personal confrontations/increased justice seeking provocation, reduced impulsivity, appropriate sleeping patterns, expanded dreams and imagination, reduced outbursts, ability to let others control situations, affectionate, idealistic
  • ♉ Taurus: Less indulgent behaviour, ability to let go of the past, endurance, patience, more comfortable with emotions, requires less materialism to feel content, balanced enjoyment between work and pleasure, affection (cheek tweaking for example), more focus on goals
  • ♊ Gemini: Talkativeness, reduced nerves and more stable sense of self, curiosity, ability to retain and recall facts, ability to sit with uncomfortable emotions, more focus/more productive distractibility, giggles, casual demeanour, increased urgency to communicate
  • ♋ Cancer: Reduced feelings of co-dependency, more stable sense of self, less patterns of indulgence, ability to live in the present and not the past, increased feelings of contentment and love for home and family, positive and idealistic imagination and dreams, controlled mood changes, increased urge to socialize
  • ♌ Leo: Reduced need for outer attention, increased feelings of self assurance, generosity, fighting for causes, less theatrical demonstrations/more rational responses, decreased inner critical voices, the warmth of the sun through them, creative
  • ♍ Virgo: Increased focus and analytical processes, decreased nerves and anxiety, less pronounced compulsions, positive inner monologue, idealism, increased self assurance, intensified urge to be of service and outreach
  • ♎ Libra: Calm; devoid of anxiety and irrationalities, decisive, social and charming, focused/positive distractibility, reduced need for external validation, decreased urge for materials to find contentment, reduced verbal outbursts, affectionate, creative
  • ♏ Scorpio: Decreased cynicism, adopting a more tolerant mindset, ability to consider new ideas without instant rejection, increased generosity towards close friends and family, curiosity, balanced sexual urgency, inquisitiveness, less closed off and isolated, affectionate
  • ♐ Sagittarius: Focused/productive distractibility, casual, warm and friendly, tolerant, ability to retain information, decreased skepticism and consideration of new ideas, contentment with location and ability to live in the present, giggles, humor
  • ♑ Capricorn: Ability to let others take control, reduced anxieties, affectionate, warm, humorous, equal work and personal life balance, positive thinking and internal monologue, less closed off and self isolated
  • ♒ Aquarius: Talkativeness, humour and entertainment, curiosity, ability to sit with uncomfortable emotions, less fixed and more malleable in own beliefs, increased insights and mind innovations, appropriate sleeping pattern, affectionate, creative
  • ♓ Pisces: More stable sense of self, reduced anxiety and nerves, directing positive escapism (reading, meditation yoga), empathetic, tolerant, guilt free, creative, affectionate, positive imaginations, favorable inner monologue, not oversleeping
mydrunkkitchen

wheresagnes:

aztec-princesss:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

*runs to target- i need to get my babydoll one for her 1st bday

ohmygosh and the one from Ethiopia has natural hair which you can’t get from the American Girl “just like you” dolls!

npr

nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.

Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian